The Value in Not Traveling Alone

Traveling alone gives me a chance to stop, block the outside voices and finally think “What is it that I want to do?” It’s a rare opportunity to remember my own needs.

But traveling with others then taught me how to assert those needs. By traveling alone, I learned how to recognize them; by traveling with people, I learned how to communicate them.

Published in Matador:

http://matadornetwork.com/life/value-not-traveling-alone/

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How Buddhism made me a better traveler

“Before the monastery, I was often in need of constant stimulation. In fact, that constant urge was a large reason why I traveled so much in the first place. While other backpackers seemed to tire after a few months on the road, I couldn’t get enough. The more “newness” in my life, the more it seemed exciting and “real.”

But at the monastery, I learned that I don’t necessarily need external stimulants to satisfy this feeling. Instead, I needed to focus on making the internal be enough.”

Published in Matador:

http://matadornetwork.com/life/i-spent-10-days-in-a-buddhist-monastery-in-nepal-heres-how-it-made-me-a-better-traveler/

5 Uncomfortable Truths About Living in San Francisco

A new report from the data company Priceonomics found that the median rental price of a one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco, as of June 2014, was $3,120, totaling to a yearly housing price of $37,440. The average starting salary for a San Francisco Unified School District teacher is $47,000. The numbers exemplify how the city has become essentially unlivable for teachers, service workers, and other employees with middle-class salaries. Many of these workers come from nonprofit organizations: almost one quarter of non-profits in San Francisco have had to leave the city as a result of higher rent prices. From 2008 to 2012, the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco found that the city lost approximately 30,000 workers with incomes of less than $35,000 a year.

http://matadornetwork.com/pulse/5-uncomfortable-truths-living-san-francisco/

5 Uncomfortable Truths About Living in South Africa

The price of a coffee in Cape Town is equal to the average daily income for a third of the South African population.

As an international line of measure, the World Bank and the United Nationsdefine poverty as living on less than US$2 a day. When the World Bank measured poverty in South Africa in 2009, they found that 31% of the country’s population lived on $2 a day or less. Poverty rates change based on province: over 70% of children in Limpopo and the Eastern Cape fall below the definition of poverty, while the Gauteng and Western Cape provinces have child poverty rates of 34% and 27% respectively. Poverty in the country also has a clear racial component:67 percent of black children live below the poverty line in South Africa compared to only 2 percent of white children.

http://matadornetwork.com/notebook/5-uncomfortable-truths-living-south-africa/

5 Excuses Millennials Make To Not Travel

A Silicon Valley techie recently wrote an article describing how he managed to trim his expenses down to $20,000 a year while living in the Bay Area, still saving enough for an occasional backpacking trip at the end of the year. Cities are tough, but they’re not impossible when you place your financial priorities in the right areas. It’s all a matter of downsizing your expenses now to experience something greater later.

Matador Network

http://matadornetwork.com/life/5-excuses-millennials-make-travel/

8 Ways Traveling Helps Couples Succeed

Couples who’ve traveled have experienced times when plans have changed, the unexpected has occurred and sometimes made everything even better than what you’d anticipated. And they also know what it’s like to be so consumed by the intensity of a wonderful moment it’s impossible to think about anything else. With these experiences in mind, couples who travel know there’s no need to overanalyze. What’s happening now is always enough.

Matador Network

http://matadornetwork.com/notebook/8-things-traveling-couples-better-couples-dont/

How to Remain a “Traveler” Once You’re Back Home

“For me, travel was not something to be experienced and then put away. It had become an integral part of my identity, an energy I carried with me every moment of my life. So the question now was: How could I maintain my identity as a traveler, even while living and working at home? After a year of trying, this is what I’ve come up with.”

http://matadornetwork.com/bnt/remain-traveler-back-home/